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Maria Farrell

Podcast Description

“‘And now I will tell you how to make Google slightly less bad without ever actually dismantling surveillance capitalism.’ This kind of sensible centrist nice kind of middle aged medium politically white guy narrative. But It’s always about that guy, or indeed that white woman or whoever is always the hero of the next bit of story. And that is the wrong story. Like, that is not the fucking story.”

Maria Farrell is an Irish writer and speaker on technology and the future. Now based in London, she has worked in tech policy for twenty years in Paris, Brussels, Los Angeles and Washington D.C. Maria has written for The Guardian, Slate, Medium, the Conversationalist, Irish Times and Irish Independent.

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Coming Soon!

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Maria Farrell

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Andre Brock

Podcast Description

“Black people are constantly lookin’ back at who they were, while constantly trying to look forward while navigating this fuckery that is white supremacy”

André Brock is an associate professor of media studies at Georgia Tech. His scholarship examines racial representations in social media, videogames, black women and weblogs, whiteness, and technoculture, including innovative and groundbreaking research on Black Twitter. His NYU Press book titled *Distributed Blackness: African American Cybercultures* was published in February 2020, offering insights to understanding Black everyday lives mediated by networked technologies.

His article “From the Blackhand Side: Twitter as a Cultural Conversation” challenged social science and communication research to confront the ways in which the field, in his words, preserved “a color-blind perspective on online endeavors by normalizing Whiteness and othering everyone else” and sparked a conversation that continues, as Twitter in particular continues to evolve as a communication platform. He has also authored influential research on digital methods, gaming, blogging, and online identity.

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Capitalism Is NOT A Failed System

Podcast Description

Capitalism has not failed, it’s only been implemented globally, rooted in white supremacy. Adam Smith, “the father” of Economics, in the 1700s, envisioned a moral economic system that worked from the ground up, was “inclusive”, and took care of the most vulnerable.

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Dr. Chris Gilliard

Podcast Description

“When your rights are being dismantled and destroyed, and your personhood isn’t respected, you shouldn’t be civil. You should cause a scene.”

Dr. Chris Gilliard is a writer, professor and speaker. His scholarship concentrates on digital privacy, and the intersections of race, class, and technology. He is an advocate for critical and equity-focused approaches to tech in education. His work has been featured in The Chronicle of Higher Ed, EDUCAUSE Review, Fast Company, Vice, and Real Life Magazine.

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Erynn Brook

Podcast Description

“There’s still quite a few people who think that ADHD is itself a parenting problem. And that stigma most definitely is also applied to Black people at a far greater rate than it is to white people. Even if it were behavioral problems…you will still see more sympathy for white parents than you would see for black parents.”

Erynn Brook is a writer living in Toronto, Canada. She write for thefullestmag.com regularly, freelance around the web, and here on this blog sporadically. Her writing weaves through conversations about media, people, culture, technology and anything else that pops into my world. She loves talking about the way we talk about things, and my work often touches on systems of oppression, through a feminist lens heavily informed by intersectional feminist voices.

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Yassmin Abdel-Magied

Podcast Description

“Up until this point I had been like the model minority….And then all of a sudden THIS model minority turns around and she thinks Islam is feminist? That she’s proud of this? That she doesn’t think that we need to change ourselves to live in this society? No no, this was unacceptable. All of a sudden I had become the controversial pariah.”

Yassmin Abdel-Magied started Youth Without Borders when she was 16, which she ran for 9 years. She then founded Mumtaza, an organisation dedicated to the normalisation of the representation of women of colour in positions of power and influence. She’s been fortunate enough to win numerous awards for her advocacy, but that isn’t why she do this work. She now travel the world talking to governments, NGO’s and multinational companies in over 20 countries on how to lead inclusively, challenge their structural and systemic biases and develop resilience in this world. Her TED talk, What does my headscarf mean to you, has been viewed over two million times and was chosen as one of TED’s top ten ideas of 2015.

She started writing social and political commentary as a teen, which led to publishing her debut memoir, Yassmin’s Story, with Penguin Random House at age 24. She followed up with her first fiction book for younger readers, You Must Be Layla, in 2019. Her essays have been published in numerous anthologies, including the Griffith Review, the best-selling It’s Not About The Burqa and The New Daughters of Africa. You can also find her in The Guardian, Teen Vogue, The New York Times, The Independent and Glamour.

She’s also done a bit of broadcasting: she presented the national TV show Australia Wide, a podcast on becoming an F1 driver and created Hijabistas, a series looking at the modest fashion scene in Australia. She’s also a regular contributor to the BBC, Monocle 24 radio and as a co-host of The Guilty Feminist.

Oh yeah – she ran a racecar team at university and worked as a driller on oil and gas rigs for four years, but that’s a whole other story

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