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Yassmin Abdel-Magied

Podcast Description

“Up until this point I had been like the model minority….And then all of a sudden THIS model minority turns around and she thinks Islam is feminist? That she’s proud of this? That she doesn’t think that we need to change ourselves to live in this society? No no, this was unacceptable. All of a sudden I had become the controversial pariah.”

Yassmin Abdel-Magied started Youth Without Borders when she was 16, which she ran for 9 years. She then founded Mumtaza, an organisation dedicated to the normalisation of the representation of women of colour in positions of power and influence. She’s been fortunate enough to win numerous awards for her advocacy, but that isn’t why she do this work. She now travel the world talking to governments, NGO’s and multinational companies in over 20 countries on how to lead inclusively, challenge their structural and systemic biases and develop resilience in this world. Her TED talk, What does my headscarf mean to you, has been viewed over two million times and was chosen as one of TED’s top ten ideas of 2015.

She started writing social and political commentary as a teen, which led to publishing her debut memoir, Yassmin’s Story, with Penguin Random House at age 24. She followed up with her first fiction book for younger readers, You Must Be Layla, in 2019. Her essays have been published in numerous anthologies, including the Griffith Review, the best-selling It’s Not About The Burqa and The New Daughters of Africa. You can also find her in The Guardian, Teen Vogue, The New York Times, The Independent and Glamour.

She’s also done a bit of broadcasting: she presented the national TV show Australia Wide, a podcast on becoming an F1 driver and created Hijabistas, a series looking at the modest fashion scene in Australia. She’s also a regular contributor to the BBC, Monocle 24 radio and as a co-host of The Guilty Feminist.

Oh yeah – she ran a racecar team at university and worked as a driller on oil and gas rigs for four years, but that’s a whole other story

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Charlton D McIlwain

Podcast Description

“I’ll say it again: it is the same thing and it is that thing that we simply refuse to talk about. Whether we’re talking about elections or we’re talking about technology. And that is the question of race.”

 is the author of the new book Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the Afronet to Black Lives Matter, Charlton McIlwain is Vice Provost for Faculty Engagement & Development at New York University and Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication. His work focuses on the intersections of computing technology, race, inequality, and racial justice activism. In addition to Black Software, McIlwain has authored Racial Formation, Inequality & the Political Economy of Web Traffic, in the journal Information, Communication & Society, and co-authored, with Deen Freelon and Meredith Clark, the recent report Beyond the Hashtags: Ferguson, #BlackLivesMatter, and the Online Struggle for Offline Justice. He recently testified before the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services about the impacts of automation and artificial intelligence on the financial services sector.

 

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Sasha Costanza-Chock

Podcast Description

“We can’t talk about what’s broken with education and coding education in the bootcamp system without zooming out to look at the larger context of our educational system. Why is it that Trump is like “Oh, I’ve got 2 trillion dollars I’ve just spent on purchasing new weapons that we’re gonna use to kill innocent people and destroy cultural heritage sites” in violation of the Geneva Conventions…but they can’t find a quarter of that to fund all the free pre-K up through higher education that they wold need for everyone would just be able to access whatever education they wanted to have, so they could maximize their potential? That’s bullshit.”

Sasha Costanza-Chock (pronouns: they/them or she/her) is a researcher, activist, designer, and media-maker. They are a Faculty Associate at the Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Faculty Affiliate with the MIT Open Documentary Lab, and creator of the MIT Codesign Studio (codesign.mit.edu). Their work focuses on social movements, transformative media organizing, and design justice. Sasha’s first book, Out of the Shadows, Into the Streets: Transmedia Organizing and the Immigrant Rights Movement was published by the MIT Press in 2014. Their new book, Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need will be published by the MIT Press in early 2020. Sasha is a board member of Allied Media Projects (alliedmedia.org) and a Steering Committee member of the Design Justice Network (designjusticenetwork.org).

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Dr. Tiffany Jana

Podcast Description

“Na-na-na-na-no Boo Boo. If you’re a good person then you need to understand exactly what your white ness means. And you need to understand what kind of harm that it has caused and continues to cause on a daily basis, no matter how woke and good you think you are.”

Dr. Tiffany Jana [pronouns: they/them/theirs] is a non-binary Awareness Artist and Pleasure Activist. She uses her work and art to create a loving embrace of people and culture that includes an emphasis on liberation through joy. Dr. Jana is the author of four inclusion books, including three best-sellers. She is the founder of TMI Consulting Inc, the world’s first diversity focused Certified Benefit Corporation. Dr. Jana has been featured in numerous publications and media including Fast Company, NY Times, and Forbes for their work on diversity, equity, empowerment, and inclusion. She was also named one of the Top 100 Leadership Speakers by Inc.com.

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Keziyah Lewis

Podcast Description

“People of color, people from a low-income background get into this much debt going to a school thinking, this is my way into the tech industry, this is my way out of poverty, this is my way to help take care of my family or help care for my parents, and then they end up being screwed over like this.”

Keziyah Lewis is a Black and queer web developer, designer, and digital nomad. She curates Juniors in Tech, a newsletter for early career technologists. She is passionate about eliminating barriers to entering tech, making the tech industry more just and diverse, and making tech companies better places to work.

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Courtney D. Cogburn

Podcast Description

“There’s a disconnect between beliefs and behavior. And there’s an investment in the symbolism of one’s beliefs and translating that as if it represents behavior when it doesn’t.”

Dr. Courtney D. Cogburn is an associate professor at the Columbia University School of Social Work and faculty of the Columbia Population Research Center. She employs a transdisciplinary research strategy to improve the characterization and measurement of racism and in examining the role of racism in the production of racial inequities in health. Dr. Cogburn’s work also explores the potential of media and technology in eradicating racism and eliminating racial inequities in health. She is the lead creator of 1000 Cut Journey, an immersive virtual reality experience of racism that premiered at the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival developed in collaboration with Jeremy Bailenson at Stanford University.

Dr. Cogburn is developing additional projects attempting to leverage emerging technologies to tackle issues of structural and cultural racism. Dr. Cogburn completed postdoctoral training at Harvard University in the Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar Program and at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. in Education and Psychology, and MSW from the University of Michigan and her BA in Psychology from the University of Virginia.

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